National Bridge Inventory: California



  • Of the 25,763 bridges in the state, 1,536, or 6.0 percent, are classified as structurally deficient. This means one of the key elements is in poor or worse condition.
  • This is up from 1,204 bridges classified as structurally deficient in 2016.
  • The deck area of structurally deficient bridges accounts for 6.5 percent of total deck area on all structures.
  • 125 of the structurally deficient bridges are on the Interstate Highway System. A total of 71.4 percent of the structurally deficient bridges are not on the National Highway System, which includes the Interstate and other key roads linking major airports, ports, rail and truck terminals.
  • 558 bridges are posted for load, which may restrict the size and weight of vehicles crossing the structure.
  • The state has identified needed repairs on 1,741 bridges at an estimated cost of $6.1 billion.
  • This compares to 4,565 bridges that needed work in 2016.

County Year Built Daily Crossings Type of Bridge Location
Los Angeles 1959 289,000 Urban freeway/expressway US Route 101 over Kester Ave
Los Angeles 1948 258,000 Urban Interstate Interstate 5 over Marietta Street
Los Angeles 1967 240,000 Urban freeway/expressway State Route 134 over Pacific Ave
Los Angeles 1967 231,000 Urban freeway/expressway State Route 60 over Wilcox Avenue
Orange 1976 229,000 Urban freeway/expressway State Route 57 over BNSF Ry,Amtrak,Metrolink
Los Angeles 1954 220,000 Urban Interstate Interstate 710 over UP RR & Noakes Street
Alameda 1961 220,000 Urban Interstate Route 580 EB over San Pblo, Adln, Mgno,Per
Los Angeles 1955 213,000 Urban Interstate Interstate 710 over Los Angeles River
Los Angeles 1970 208,000 Urban freeway/expressway State Route 60 over Old Brea Cyn Rd
Santa Clara 1965 203,000 Urban Interstate Interstate 280 over Lawrence Expwy & Creek
Solano 1932 202,000 Urban Interstate Interstate 80 over Suisun Creek
Solano 1951 202,000 Urban Interstate Interstate 80 over Dan Wilson Creek
San Diego 1971 199,000 Urban Interstate Interstate 805 over Telegraph Canyon Drain
San Diego 1961 199,000 Urban Interstate Interstate 5 over Rte 163, Connectors
San Mateo 1930 195,000 Urban freeway/expressway U.S. Highway 101 over Cordilleras Creek
Solano 1928 189,000 Urban Interstate Interstate 80 over Green Valley Creek
Alameda 1962 182,000 Urban Interstate Interstate 580 over Lakeshore Bl & Grand Ave
Contra Costa 1964 180,000 Urban Interstate Interstate 680 over Rudgear Road
San Mateo 1967 178,000 Urban Interstate Interstate 280 over Southgate Avenue
Los Angeles 1953 175,000 Urban freeway/expressway Route 101 over Argyle Av & Franklin Av
Los Angeles 1957 175,000 Urban freeway/expressway U.S. Highway 101 over Los Angeles River
Alameda 1961 174,000 Urban Interstate Route 580 over Martin Luther King Jr Wy
Alameda 1961 174,000 Urban Interstate Route 580 over Piedmont, Broadway, Rich
Contra Costa 1964 171,000 Urban Interstate Interstate 680 over El Pintado Road
Los Angeles 1952 170,000 Urban freeway/expressway U.S. Highway 101 over Cahuenga Blvd
Type of Bridge Number of Bridges Area of All Bridges
(sq. meters)
Daily Crossings on All Bridges Number of Structurally Deficient Bridges Area of Structurally Deficient Bridges
(sq. meters)
Daily Crossings on Structurally Deficient Bridges
Rural Interstate 1,204 1,326,188 30,907,541 59 54,037 1,496,525
Rural arterial 1,402 1,280,711 22,318,365 66 72,115 845,963
Rural minor arterial 1,463 1,019,351 7,398,629 66 64,539 312,120
Rural major collector 2,194 1,036,898 5,631,473 197 131,431 472,511
Rural minor collector 1,218 411,693 1,384,837 111 34,374 113,462
Rural local road 4,150 1,077,269 3,114,957 383 71,175 170,450
Urban Interstate 2,629 7,959,941 271,126,529 66 378,191 6,019,355
Urban freeway/expressway 3,103 6,968,936 210,293,473 89 513,278 5,793,938
Urban other principal arterial 2,541 3,911,836 61,624,172 160 315,973 4,294,953
Urban minor arterial 2,593 3,099,295 37,026,394 163 235,251 2,444,763
Urban collector 1,423 969,453 8,763,848 79 43,235 514,082
Urban local road 1,843 1,106,790 8,376,261 97 39,300 263,019
Total 25,763 30,168,359 667,966,479 1,536 1,952,900 22,741,141
Type of Work Number of Bridges Cost to Repair
(in millions)
Daily Crossings Area of Bridges
(sq. meters)
Bridge replacement 483 $1,354 2,965,332 277,852
Widening & rehabilitation 3 $1 3,600 341
Rehabilitation 1,087 $4,522 20,086,674 1,719,264
Deck rehabilitation/replacement 8 $4 290 921
Other structural work 160 $187 223,557 46,838
Total 1,741 $6,069 23,279,453 2,045,217

About the data:

Data is from the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) National Bridge Inventory (NBI), downloaded on March 11, 2021. Note that specific conditions on bridges may have changed as a result of recent work or updated inspections. Cost estimates were downloaded by ARTBA on March 11, 2021.

Effective January 1, 2018, FHWA changed the definition of structurally deficient as part of the final rule on highway and bridge performance measures, published May 20, 2017 pursuant to the 2012 federal aid highway bill Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act (MAP-21). Two measures that were previously used to classify bridges as structurally deficient are no longer used. This includes bridges where the overall structural evaluation was rated in poor or worse condition, or where the adequacy of waterway openings was insufficient.

The new definition limits the classification to bridges where one of the key structural elements—the deck, superstructure, substructure or culverts, are rated in poor or worse condition. During inspection, the conditions of a variety of bridge elements are rated on a scale of 0 (failed condition) to 9 (excellent condition). A rating of 4 is considered “poor” condition.

Cost estimates have been derived by ARTBA, based on 2019 average bridge replacement costs for structures on and off the National Highway System, published by FHWA. Bridge rehabilitation costs are estimated to be 68 percent of replacement costs. A bridge is considered to need repair if the structure has identified repairs as part of the NBI, a repair cost estimate is supplied by the bridge owner or the bridge is classified as structurally deficient. Please note that for a few states, the number of bridges needing to be repaired can vary significantly from year to year, and reflects the data entered by the state.

Bridges are classified by FHWA into types based on the functional classification of the roadway on the bridge. Interstates comprise routes officially designated by the Secretary of Transportation. Other principal arterials serve major centers of urban areas or provide mobility through rural areas. Freeways and expressways have directional lanes generally separated by a physical barrier, and access/egress points generally limited to on- and off-ramps. Minor arterials serve smaller areas and are used for trips of moderate length. Collectors funnel traffic from local roads to the arterial network; major collectors have higher speed limits and traffic volumes and are longer in length and spaced at greater intervals, while minor collectors are shorter and provide service to smaller communities. Local roads do not carry through traffic and are intended for short distance travel.

29
Compared to 28 in 2019

in the nation in % of structurally deficient bridges

1. West Virginia 21.2%
29. California 6.0%
30. Indiana 5.7%

9
Compared to 7 in 2019

in the nation in # of structurally deficient bridges

1. Iowa 4,571
8. West Virginia 1,545
9. California 1,536
10. North Carolina 1,460

23
Compared to 22 in 2019

in the nation in % of structurally deficient bridge deck area

1. Rhode Island 21.0%
22. North Carolina 7.0%
23. California 7.0%
24. South Carolina 6.0%
Full State Ranking

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  • Source: Data is from the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) National Bridge Inventory (NBI), downloaded on March 11, 2021. Note that specific conditions on bridges may have changed as a result of recent work or updated inspections.

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