National Bridge Inventory: New York



  • Of the 17,555 bridges in the state, 1,672, or 9.5 percent, are classified as structurally deficient. This means one of the key elements is in poor or worse condition.
  • This is down from 1,771 bridges classified as structurally deficient in 2017.
  • The deck area of structurally deficient bridges accounts for 10.5 percent of total deck area on all structures.
  • 141 of the structurally deficient bridges are on the Interstate Highway System. A total of 78.9 percent of the structurally deficient bridges are not on the National Highway System, which includes the Interstate and other key roads linking major airports, ports, rail and truck terminals.
  • 963 bridges are posted for load, which may restrict the size and weight of vehicles crossing the structure.
  • The state has identified needed repairs on 17,549 bridges at an estimated cost of $33.4 billion.
  • This compares to 17,438 bridges that needed work in 2017.

County Year Built Daily Crossings Type of Bridge Location
Kings 1962 190,572 Urban Interstate Rte I278 over 278I 278Ix2Mr07C1, 15th
Kings 1942 163,762 Urban freeway/expressway Rte 907C over Ocean Avenue
Kings 1942 163,762 Urban freeway/expressway Rte 907C over Sheepshead Bay Rd
Queens 1972 161,765 Urban freeway/expressway Rte 907M over 907A907Ax5M22126, Rte 90
Queens 1971 161,765 Urban freeway/expressway Rte 907M over Commonwealth Blvd
Bronx 1960 150,527 Urban Interstate Rte I278 over Bruckner Expwy EB, Bruck
Kings 1954 146,107 Urban Interstate Rte I278 over Flushing Avenue
New York 1936 144,424 Urban freeway/expressway Rte 907V over Amtrak W Side Con
Queens 1963 142,880 Urban freeway/expressway Rte 907M over Midland Parkway West, Mi
Bronx 1951 138,800 Urban Interstate Rte I95 over Bronx River Ave., Rte I8
Kings 1948 134,789 Urban Interstate Rte I278 over Old Fulton Street S/B, R
Queens 1963 133,885 Urban Interstate Rte I678 over Flushing Creek, Meadow L
New York 1985 129,927 Urban freeway/expressway Rte 907 over East River Shore
New York 1939 129,646 Urban freeway/expressway Rte 9A over 158th Street, Amtrak-W S
New York 1939 129,646 Urban freeway/expressway Rte 907V over Amtrak-W Side Con
Queens 1941 129,030 Urban freeway/expressway Rte 907A over Totten Ave
Rockland 1953 121,953 Urban Interstate Rte I87 over Rte 303
Rockland 1953 121,953 Urban Interstate Rte I87 over Route 59 WB, Rte 59
Kings 1944 120,383 Urban Interstate Rte I278 over Rte I278, Brooklyn Bridg
Bronx 1951 119,529 Urban freeway/expressway Rte 907H over East 180th Street, Morri
Bronx 1951 119,529 Urban freeway/expressway Rte 907H over Amtrak/CSXT/P&W
Bronx 1951 119,529 Urban freeway/expressway Rte 907H over E Tremont Avenue
New York 1883 116,071 Urban freeway/expressway Brooklyn Bridge
Bronx 1960 111,309 Urban Interstate Rte I87 over Alexander Avenue
Queens 1969 107,933 Urban freeway/expressway Rte I495 over Rte I495, 58th Street, 4
Type of Bridge Number of Bridges Area of All Bridges
(sq. meters)
Daily Crossings on All Bridges Number of Structurally Deficient Bridges Area of Structurally Deficient Bridges
(sq. meters)
Daily Crossings on Structurally Deficient Bridges
Rural Interstate 601 548,159 6,570,469 39 33,251 560,631
Rural arterial 678 506,336 3,897,447 48 48,664 244,869
Rural minor arterial 707 301,939 2,451,250 60 30,818 222,856
Rural major collector 1,400 480,468 2,646,123 114 42,550 219,152
Rural minor collector 1,765 375,742 1,326,983 158 33,801 127,470
Rural local road 4,157 661,294 1,163,429 599 72,809 133,820
Urban Interstate 1,697 4,146,985 65,060,512 102 549,821 4,131,601
Urban freeway/expressway 1,198 2,063,221 46,945,148 60 244,922 3,366,890
Urban other principal arterial 1,183 1,741,573 21,891,099 85 105,357 1,540,128
Urban minor arterial 1,537 1,344,008 15,129,190 126 115,192 1,078,629
Urban collector 1,226 612,912 5,144,066 119 67,092 474,210
Urban local road 1,406 597,349 2,456,174 162 57,811 211,771
Total 17,555 13,379,984 174,681,890 1,672 1,402,087 12,312,027
Type of Work Number of Bridges Cost to Repair
(in millions)
Daily Crossings Area of Bridges
(sq. meters)
Bridge replacement 8 $6 2,575 1,644
Widening & rehabilitation 15,494 $29,521 154,979,594 11,815,326
Rehabilitation 15 $55 23,806 22,280
Deck rehabilitation/replacement 2,007 $3,825 19,654,902 1,529,336
Other structural work 25 $16 2,079 6,179
Total 17,549 $33,423 174,662,956 13,374,765

About the data:

Data is from the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) National Bridge Inventory (NBI), downloaded on January 3, 2022. Note that specific conditions on bridges may have changed as a result of recent work or updated inspections. Cost estimates were downloaded by ARTBA on January 3, 2022.

Effective January 1, 2018, FHWA changed the definition of structurally deficient as part of the final rule on highway and bridge performance measures, published May 20, 2017 pursuant to the 2012 federal aid highway bill Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act (MAP-21). Two measures that were previously used to classify bridges as structurally deficient are no longer used. This includes bridges where the overall structural evaluation was rated in poor or worse condition, or where the adequacy of waterway openings was insufficient.

The new definition limits the classification to bridges where one of the key structural elements—the deck, superstructure, substructure or culverts, are rated in poor or worse condition. During inspection, the conditions of a variety of bridge elements are rated on a scale of 0 (failed condition) to 9 (excellent condition). A rating of 4 is considered “poor” condition.

Cost estimates have been derived by ARTBA, based on 2020 average bridge replacement costs for structures on and off the National Highway System, published by FHWA. Bridge rehabilitation costs are estimated to be 68 percent of replacement costs. A bridge is considered to need repair if the structure has identified repairs as part of the NBI, a repair cost estimate is supplied by the bridge owner or the bridge is classified as structurally deficient. Please note that for a few states, the number of bridges needing to be repaired can vary significantly from year to year, and reflects the data entered by the state.

Bridges are classified by FHWA into types based on the functional classification of the roadway on the bridge. Interstates comprise routes officially designated by the Secretary of Transportation. Other principal arterials serve major centers of urban areas or provide mobility through rural areas. Freeways and expressways have directional lanes generally separated by a physical barrier, and access/egress points generally limited to on- and off-ramps. Minor arterials serve smaller areas and are used for trips of moderate length. Collectors funnel traffic from local roads to the arterial network; major collectors have higher speed limits and traffic volumes and are longer in length and spaced at greater intervals, while minor collectors are shorter and provide service to smaller communities. Local roads do not carry through traffic and are intended for short distance travel.

12
Compared to 13 in 2020

in the nation in % of structurally deficient bridges

1. West Virginia 20.4%
11. Oklahoma 9.9%
12. New York 9.5%
13. Missouri 9.0%

6
Compared to 8 in 2020

in the nation in # of structurally deficient bridges

1. Iowa 4,504
5. Missouri 2,218
6. New York 1,672
7. Louisiana 1,631

5
Compared to 5 in 2020

in the nation in % of structurally deficient bridge deck area

1. Rhode Island 19.5%
4. Massachusetts 11.3%
5. New York 10.5%
6. South Dakota 9.7%
Full State Ranking

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  • Source: Data is from the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) National Bridge Inventory (NBI), downloaded on January 3, 2022. Note that specific conditions on bridges may have changed as a result of recent work or updated inspections.

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